Drupal distro for designing courses

mathieso's picture

(This is going out on several channels. Apologies if you get more than one copy.)

There are many Web sites and tools for authoring textbooks: iBooks Author, Flat World Knowledge, etc. Good tech, but there's a fundamental flaw in their specs. They're based on an obsolete view of learning.

Education researchers have shown how we can help students learn STEM skills (STEM: science, tech, engineering and math). Deep learning, formative feedback, other things. We need to redesign authoring software based on these research findings.

That's what the Dolfinity project is about. It has three parts:

  1. A guide to designing skill courses based on learning science research. The document improves as we learn more about learning.

  2. A Drupal distro to help anyone create dolfins. Dolfins are Web sites that replace textbooks and lectures. "Dolfin" is an acronym for research-based practices: Deep learning, Outcome-based Learning, Formative feedback, Interaction with experts, and Nudging students.

  3. A community, to (1) improve the guide and the software, and (2) help people make dolfins.

Dolfinity is designed for courses in programming, statistics, etc. But we could also make dolfins that help people learn Drupal. The Dolfinity Way promotes effective/efficient learning, as well as effective/efficient authoring. Dolfinity would help us make the best use of the community's scarce training resources.

Dolfinity has a different goal from distros like ELMS. Dolfinity would borrow shamelessly from ELMS, however.

Dofinity is crowd funded through Kickstarter. More at:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1198891934/dolfinity-effective-effic...

Regards,
Kieran Mathieson, PhD, OD (old dude)
248 266 1296
kieran@dolfinity.com
http://dolfinity.com

Comments

Cool!

bonobo's picture

Great to see this project!

We've been doing some similar work, with a more targeted focus on open content. We're actually doing the first of several content authoring events later this week: http://funnymonkey.com/almost-educon-open-content-creation-and-remix-fest

Will Dolfin be available as a downloadable distro on d.o, or are you envisioning a SaaS model?

Thnx

mathieso's picture

Probably both. A distro on d.o., plus SaaS for people who don't want to do setup.

Good luck with the Fest. Sounds like fun will be had.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Very cool idea! Please feel

btopro's picture

Very cool idea! Please feel free to "shamelessly steal" from ELMS, it's part of why it's out there (learn, deconstruct the concepts, replicate).

Will you be pursuing D6 or D7 with this concept? I know Coredogs in the past was D6 so just curious. If it's D7 you can probably snag bundles of functionality from http://drupal.org/project/cis and http://drupal.org/project/mooc

D7. It will be rebuilt, not

mathieso's picture

D7. It will be rebuilt, not an adaption of CoreDogs.

k


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Love to see this in D7

autopoietic's picture

It will be great if you can take advantage of some of the other work being done in this area, as btopro suggests. In particular it would be great to be able to take advantage of the 'Dolfins' from within a standard LMS, using LTI.

I think it could be really good to separate out this pedagogy focussed project from the LMS style projects, so that for example CIS could create dolfins based on this distribution, and handle the overarching course structures and workflow, while dolfinity focussed entirely on learning outcomes.

Dolfinity as LTI Tool Provider

mathieso's picture

Dudes, this is exciting. LTI solves a bunch o' problems, if course enrollment and such can be handed off from a dolfin to Angel or Moodle.

Not just half a bunch o' problems. A whole bunch.

Can I ask some questions? I need to explain a little about dolfins. They have chapters, lessons - a lesson is a page. Text, images, and video. Lots of exercises. Most exercises are embedded in the lessons, right in the middle of the content. Some exercises are separated out into end-of-chapter things.

Sequence is pedagogically important. Chapter 5 depends on ideas from chapter 4 depends on ideas from chapter 3, etc.

There are other pedagogical elements, like patterns. A pattern is an abstracted subgoal/solution chunk. It is developed and presented in the text, and also presented in a separate pattern library. Each pattern links to its library entry, as well as its use in the text, and in exercises.

Students complete exercises, submit exercises through the dolfin. Graders get a feedback interface. When there is a student submission, the feedback system shows the exercise, student solution, and feedback rubric to the grader. The grader clicks on elements of the rubric, to create feedback.

There are standard looks for some paragraphs, e.g., aside, NB, etc. They are consistent on the authoring and learning side.

OK, enough about dolfins. See if this makes sense.

A dolfin could be an LTI tool provider. It would provide resources, like chapters, lessons, and exercises. It would track users using LTI users, contexts, etc.

Some questions:

(I know there are many questions here. You don't have to answer them all at once. But LTI could be awesome for dolfins - want to make sure there are no deal breakers.)

1. LTI doesn't cover interfaces, right? Each tool has its own editors and such. A tool consumer (e.g, Moodle) opens a iframe (most likely) on a page, uses LTI to ask a provider to fill the iframe, giving it context info to do so.

Is that right?

2. Dolfins can be white labeled. The tool consumer can put things like school name and colors into variables, that the tool provider can use to customize content look. Is that right?

3. If 2 is right, would there be a user interface on the tool consumer side so that humans can enter values for those variables? Are there standards for what variables are defined? Didn't see them in the spec, but maybe I just missed them.

3a. For a tool provider to be commercially viable, it might have to have, e.g., a Moodle plugin with an interface for those variables. Is that right?

4. So the consumer asks the tool for grade information. A dolfin has data for each exercise, maybe 100 exercises per student. Are there good interfaces in, e.g., Moodle, for instructors to use that info?

5. Dolfins keep a lot of data on, for example, grader performance, rubric click frequencies for each exercise, etc. It looks like that could be sent through the LTI link, although what the consumer would do with it, is another question. Is that right?

6. Mobile. I'm guessing that the consumer should detect device capabilities, compute appropriate dimensions, and send the dimensions to the tool provider, which uses them for rendering. Sound right?

7. Navigation - there'll be at least two navbars - one from the consumer (outside nav) and one from the provider (inside nav). Is that right?

If so, that means two different interaction mechanisms. No synching of their look-and-feel. Is that right?

8. Copyright. LTI could help here. A tool consumer could tell the provider (using a variable) whether content availability is in a controlled educational context, for the purposes of the TEACH act (in the US, anyway - don't know EU regs). The provider could then decide whether to show protected content.

Sounds like a win. Does this sound right?

9. Student performance info is held by the tool provider. So the provider has to comply with data privacy/security regs. Right?

10. Payment. Suppose dolfin access is sold to schools (site licenses), for specific courses, or to individual students. I'm guessing that it's up to the tool provider to worry about this, right?

If a student buys a license for a dolfin, how does that get tied to that student's OAuth?

OK, I'll stop with the questions. Sorry sorry sorry for having so many. Like I said, LTI could be big for the Dolfinity project.

k


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

http://drupal.org/project/lti

btopro's picture

http://drupal.org/project/lti_tool_provider is a very easy to implement and set yourself up relationships w/ 3rd party / existing systems other people have. Maintaining single sign on would be a challenge outside the walled gardens of education but I'm sure there are solutions to that as well (namely LTI, just not caring about a "user name") that makes sense.

iFrame is one approach, another is taking them off to your tool for a portion of the interaction, then sending them back to the context they came from. LTI allows for use of context provided from one system to another. There is also a spec for grade transmission but it's pretty limited, 1 piece of data to 1 grade-book context identifier.

https://drupal.psu.edu/content/learning-tools-interoperability-drupal showcases extension of the LMS (angel, moodle, whatever) into a drupal based learning environment. CIS is the middleware that your payment / data management can happen. This is also where the LTI launch (initial) can occur. LTI is just oAuth so it can be resigned so you could have someone call for a tool against CIS, figure out where they came from, match to a paid account, and then resign and bounce the user invisibly over to the tool that they are paying for.

Data privacy yes, you have to worry about that where ever the person goes and it's on you to maintain that privacy / security no matter the tools.

Answers to LTI questions.

jzornig's picture

Answers,
1. Yes, the tool provider is responsible for it's own user interface.
2. Yes, there is context like the link title and description as well as the course name, also you can add custom variables that the tool provider uses to customise things like menus and navigation.
3. These are custom variables. Just a set of name=value pairs that are sent to the provider in the lit-info.
3a. I've used both Moodle an Bb and they each support custom variables.
4. Currently the tool provider is limited to a single gradebook column per LTI link. So a dolfin could aggregate a score for a module from multiple quizzes and activities and just pass on the aggregate to the consumer.
5. Perhaps in a future version of LTI. Look up the Tin Can API, it might be the solution to this.
6. The Provider can do this itself. Detecting device capabilities usually happens in the browser not on the server, unless you are dealing with web apps.
7. Two nav bars if the tool is launched in an iframe, which is optional. In the tools I'm building I'm concentrating on minimal navigation ui as the learner/user is already inside a course, so you don't want to confuse them with too many nav options.
8. A tool could behave differently for different consumers.
9. Yes, but the consumer has to decide what student info it will pass to the provider. The provider may not know a student's name or id if that is how the consumer is configured.
10. Yes.

JZ

@mathieso: Great initiative

markwk's picture

@mathieso: Great initiative and definitely wish you best of luck.

I'm not totally sure about the learning philosophy behind your project, but I think a lot of use in the Drupal Education space understand the need to create something like a "learning path," i.e. a collection of content, quiz, videos and tons of other learning stuff and craft into a pathway of steps to learning. I applaud your thought to work on this challenge.

I posted a question or two in the comments of your drupal site http://dolfinity.com but didn't get published. Maybe you didn't like what I asked ;)

  1. Anyways, I saw that this kickstarter project comes with a pretty hefty price tag at $314,159. I don't denial that if you come up with this kind of mix of research, community and a truly solid, feature-rich, user-friendly drupal distro, the price is off. I just wonder if that's a tangible number initially, especially for the initial MVP?

  2. Who exactly do you have on your team so far from the Drupal dev community? I tend to invest more in teams than "idea pitches," i.e. if you got the guys to code it, I'm apt to write a check since I know at least some contrib code will come out of this.

  3. If possible, what the features you plan to have in the Drupal distro? Any thoughts on your "starting position" in terms of currently existing setups?

Anyways, best of luck... keep us all posted on your progress!

Mark - thnx for taking the

mathieso's picture

Mark - thnx for taking the time to write. I hadn't noticed your comment on dolfcom - the notification system must be broken. It's published now.

The learning philosophy is critical. "Philosophy" implies "general thoughts" to some people. My approach is not like that. It's firmly grounded in research, and pragmatic.

I've been teaching tech skills for ages - been a prof since 1987. Then I spent a couple of years learning about learning. Turns out that learning science researchers more-or-less agree on how we should help people learn skills. But we don't use their ideas in real courses.

I created a learning model based on their findings, and a set of practices to support it. Implemented it at coredogs.com. It works well. CoreDogs is a D6 site, with much custom code. Dofinity aims to help other people create CoreDogs-like things.

This isn't just an idea pitch. CoreDogs has been used for several years, at Oakland University and Claremont Graduate University. You can try it anytime. The learning model etc are documented as well.

The Dolfinity Drupal distro is less than half the project. There's also (1) a guide on designing skill courses, and (2) a community. The guide is not a s/w manual. It's about choosing course outcomes, developing a learning path, making exercises, creating feedback rubrics, etc.

The project is not right for Kickstarter - I realize that now. I need to find different funding sources, maybe more traditional VC. Dolfinity's commercial implications are ginormous. See http://dolfinity.com/why-support-project .

About teams. I created CoreDogs on my own, though based, of course, on other people's learning science research and Drupal work. I could do all the tech work myself, because I was doing it for myself, and could tolerate rough (sharp!) edges.

I'd rather work with a Drupally team, but don't know how to find people who might be interested. Any suggestions?

BTW, I'm open to changing the project. I don't have all the answers. Nobody does.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

So, as far as I've

fuzzy76's picture

So, as far as I've understood, this is a system consisting of:

  1. A book / guide about creating online courses.

  2. A Drupal distro for creating courses which consists of Quiz, Book and a couple of other common modules. Sort of like what ELMS and others already do for free.

  3. A discussion forum where people creating courses can talk amongst themselves.

What's really new here? As far as I can see, this is just another elearning distro or a marketing package for a book about a philosophy about online learning. Sorry if I'm negative, but I really don't see anything here that is particulary new or groundbreaking.

You're missing

mathieso's picture

You're missing something.

Here's the point:

1. Researchers have discovered how to help people learn skills. Skill learning can be efficient and effective, iff courses implement outcome-based learning, deep learning, formative feedback, metacognitive awareness, and other things that most people have never heard of. The research is in, the evidence clear.

2. Few profs or authors even know that these principles exist. Fewer still implement them. The result? Skill learning is ineffective and inefficient. Too much busy work, not enough skill building.

The result of that? Failure rates in STEM skill courses are high. Many students are convinced that science and tech jobs are beyond their reach. They give up on STEM.

This does not need to happen. If STEM courses were taught effectively (most aren't), more people would succeed at math, science, programming, etc. They could get good jobs, with decent salaries.

> 1. A book / guide about creating online courses.

No! A guide to creating effective and efficient skill learning courses. They are actually hybrid - partly online. The guide is about how to plan an outcome-based course (not usually done), how to encourage deep learning (unusual in current practice), how to use formative feedback (not common practice), how to encourage metacognition (equally rare), etc.

Can you show me a guide that follows these ideas?

> 2. A Drupal distro for creating courses which consists of Quiz, Book and a couple of other common modules. Sort of like what ELMS and others already do for free.

No! ELMS and others are about managing courses, not constructing sound skill courses in the first place. The purpose is different.

Can you show me how deep learning, outcome-based learning, formative feedback, etc., are explicitly built into ELMS?

> 3. A discussion forum where people creating courses can talk amongst themselves.

No! More than that. A community to:

* Help people understand what skill learning research has shown.

* Improve the guide as researchers learn more.

* Help authors design courses that implement research-backed skill learning principles.

* Help authors build good courses that fit in with admin practices.

* Help instructors use skill learning resources to help students learn efficiently and effectively.

* Help authors market their work, to schools boards, university faculty, etc.

Can you show me such a community?

The bottom line: the education sector - in the US anyway - is doing a poor job when it comes to helping people learn STEM skills. Many people have come to believe: "Well, that's just the way it is. Math and science are hard."

We can do better. We start by applying what we already know about how to learn skills. That's what Dolfinity is about. There is nothing like it out there. If you think there is, please show me.

http://dolfinity.com has more about this, if you care to read it.


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

So would I be correct in

aboutblank's picture

So would I be correct in interpreting this as an online course design framework that scaffolds educators through the design process to make smart pedagogical choices by default?

I've been thinking about building something similar myself, so this is definitely an interesting project.

Aye, that's one way to put

mathieso's picture

Aye, that's one way to put it. I hadn't thought about it that way before, but it's a good description.

Simple example - we know that pedagogical agents are useful. So, make it easy for authors to add pedagogical agents (characters). Here's a short video:

http://dolfinity.com/discussion/video-adding-character-dolfin-page

Another example - learning patterns:

http://dolfinity.com/discussion/video-patterns-deep-learning

Important point: this isn't a wizard-fill-in-the-blank thing. Instead, authors need to understand how learning works, understand their audience, etc. The scaffolding is a tool kit - authors have to know how to use it.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

...authors need to understand

aboutblank's picture

...authors need to understand how learning works, understand their audience, etc. The scaffolding is a tool kit - authors have to know how to use it.

You've already lost them. Most won't try to understand how to use it, especially if you tell them they need to. That's why we're stuck with Blackboard.

To me, the key is to allow the system itself to at least encourage pedagogically-useful design through smart defaults and, yes, sometimes wizard-fill-in-the-blank things. It's like the "convention over configuration" motto of web dev frameworks like Ruby on Rails and Drupal: the framework itself provides a bunch of best practices for free which you can mix and mash together to make something. You can always work outside that framework, but you have to override the defaults and justify why you are doing so (and it's usually easier to just stay within the framework!).

But I like where you are going with this. My point is that you can smash the "guide to designing skill courses" together with the platform itself. That's the sweet spot we're missing in the LMS market.

we constantly get in this

btopro's picture

we constantly get in this battle between structure / scaffolding and total control / wizard setup. This is why we either start with 1 of the following 2 options for making a new course:

  • You either copy a previously well-made course
  • You start from one of 3 documented and proven instructional course flows that we use in house

The content of these pages currently just has sample content but in the near future will come with a good page layout that is stepping you through how a Unit landing page might flow (for example). Or if using a video, how best to frame it in a discussion. Or if you have objectives, how best to communicate them both in the flow with other items as well as visually in presentation.

(Adapted from below.) That

mathieso's picture

(Adapted from below.)

That sounds reasonable, but it's not enough.

Dolfinity is not designed - primarily - for people teaching courses. Maybe that's an important misunderstanding.

Dolfinity is for people creating dolfins, Web sites that replace textbooks and lectures. Dolfins also have tools that let instructors give students feedback, track performance, customize content, etc., but those tasks are secondary to authors creating dolfins in the first place.

(Dolfinity fits well with your "explode the LMS" idea. Dolfins are content/exercise packages. Other tools wrap dolfins in a course context.)

Why are templates not enough? Take screenplays. There is no wizard you can fill in to make a good one.

There are resources you can use. For example, that "save the cat" book lays out a formula for a bread-and-butter Hollywood movie. But even that isn't a wizard. It's a set of principles. It's up to you to figure out how to implement them to create a good script.

You could make an MS Word template for a screenplay. It would have a front page, with a space for a title and the writer's name. It would have a page for dramatis personae. It would have a page with "Act 1. Scene 1." at the top.

But that's all. It wouldn't help you do the hard work of writing the screenplay. It's all just help with the surface.

Writing a good dolfin is like writing a good screenplay. It's hard. There are principles you should learn. Some people spend years learning them. The principles don't show up in the tech of Word. They emerge from deep in the content.

Most people won't spend the years it takes to become a professional screenwriter. But if you don't, you can't consistently create high quality scripts.

Writing a good skill learning dolfin is as difficult as writing a good screenplay.

Dolfinity will help authors write dolfins, and give them tools to help, once they have learned the principles. However, it will take at least months to learn. Not learn the software, that's easy. Learn the craft of writing dolfins.

BTW, I doubt that more than 2% of the faculty at PSU (outside the ed school) could explain things like formative feedback. They have no training in education. Dolfinity bakes chocolatey learning science goodness into dolfins. Faculty get the benefits of learning research, w/o needing to become experts themselves.

I appreciate your taking the time to comment. Obviously, I'm not explaining this project very well. Any suggestions?

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

It's not enough

mathieso's picture

@aboutbank: I disagree.

You've already lost them. Most won't try to understand how to use it...

You're right. Most will walk away.

That's one of the problems with university instruction, IMHO. To be a true professional at creating courses, to do a good job, requires study. Profs demand it of their students, but not of themselves.

That's what makes Dolfinity different. It doesn't sacrifice quality. Sure, the tools make it easier for authors to create high quality skill learning products. I've spent about 7 years so far getting to this point. Dolfinity will help people get there in, maybe, 6 months.

Why would someone spend the time? Several reasons. One of them is money. Check http://dolfinity.com/new-business-model if you are interested.

BTW, I appreciate being able to have this discussion.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

A similar approach: 4C/ID

Whylk's picture

In the Netherlands we have some experience with the 4C/ID model. This model has a strong learning philosophy and it is related to the ISD model of David Merrill.

I think that there are some similarities. The 4C/ID model has never been used in Drupal I presume. Based on the 4C/ID model a software tool has been developed. I have used it for some time, it was nice but also very complex. In following is a description of the project.

http://www.science.uva.nl/research/ias/alumni/m.sc.theses/theses/WouterK...

The 4C/ID model is described in following.

http://www.speakeasydesigns.com/SDSU/student/SAGE/compsprep/4CIC_Compete...

http://www.willus.com/k2pdfopt/examples/margins/blueprintsex.pdf

I think its always nice to have some lessons learned.

Best regards, Willem

Thank you!

mathieso's picture

This is great stuff. Thnx for pointing it out. I can see what you mean about complexity!

The paper "Blueprints for Complex Learning: The 4C/ID-Model" is incomplete, only a few pages. I tried searching for it in Google, but in vain. Do you have a complete copy?

May I ask what you use 4C/ID for?

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

4C/ID

Whylk's picture

I have used the model in the Dutch Air Force for the design of Aircraft Maintainer training, pilot training and Air Control training.

It is also used in Dutch Universities and High Schools.

This is another link:

http://www.ou.nl/Docs/Expertise/OTEC/Publicaties/jeroen%20van%20merrienb....

Best regards,

Willem

Thnx. I'll take a look.

mathieso's picture

Thnx. I'll take a look.


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Concerning getting teachers to engage with pedagogy

autopoietic's picture

Just caught up with the thread, I think btpro already discussed most of this above.

I had a quick look at the dolfinity.com screencasts (eg Adding a character to a dolfin page), and noticed that construction of a dolfin seems intended to take place in the wysiwyg editor.

This is a nice simple way to give teachers a way to flexibly create their content, but I would suggest that it may not be the best way to initially get people to apply sound learning principles. I would expect some Dolfin creators to look at the interface, glance at a couple of the buttons that appeal to them, discount others because without testing them out they cannot perceive their relevance, and then cover the page with duplicated instances of, for example, the character item.

I suggest that while retaining the flexibility of the wysiwyg authoring environment, there might also be a parallel, wizard based method that you can use to create a dolfin in several steps, based on a couple of simple templates, each labelled with the intended learning style. The resultant learning proposition would is then editable as above, but the new user is given some idea of how they might go about constructing the learning experience.

I would hope that the wizard approach might garner some motivation from the user by making it simple to get started, with some confidence that the tools are being used as intended.

Any thoughts?

Wrong end of the stick

mathieso's picture

I removed the video of including the character in the WYSIWYG interface. It may have misled you.

Using that video to judge Dolfinity is like judging a painting by its frame, or a novel by the font it's printed in.

Dolfinity is about writing and using dolfins, Web sites that replace lectures and textbooks for skills courses, like programming. Dolfin stands for Deep learning - Outcome-based Learning - formative Feedback - Interaction with experts - Nudging students. These principles are from learning science research. Few authors, profs, or teachers know about these ideas.

Using dolfins, instructors stop lecturing. They become tutors instead. They focus on troubleshooting, and explaining one-on-one with students.

Dolfinity is about learning skills efficiently. The important stuff is NOT in the interfaces. It's in setting course goals, creating exercises with good rubrics, writing content showing problem-solving processes, etc.

Teachers don't write content (not primarily). Authors do.

I didn't address btopro's suggestion about templates - maybe I should have. It sounds reasonable, but it's not enough.

Take screenplays, for example. There is no wizard you can fill in to make a good one.

There are resources you can use. For example, that "save the cat" book lays out a formula for a bread-and-butter Hollywood movie. But even that isn't a wizard. It's a set of principles. It's up to you to figure out how to implement them to create a good script.

You could make an MS Word template for a screenplay. It would have a front page, with a space for a title and the writer's name. It would have a page for dramatis personae. It would have a page with "Act 1. Scene 1." at the top.

But that's all. It wouldn't help you do the hard work of writing the screenplay. It's all just help with the surface.

Writing a good dolfin is like writing a good screenplay. It's hard. There are principles you should learn. Some people spend years learning them. The principles don't show up in the tech of Word. They emerge from deep in the content.

Most people won't spend the years it takes to become a professional screenwriter. But if you don't, you can't consistently create high quality scripts.

Writing a good skill learning dolfin is as difficult as writing a good screenplay.

Dolfinity will help authors write dolfins, and give them tools to help, once they have learned the principles. However, it will take at least months to learn. Not learn the software, that's easy. Learn the craft of writing dolfins.

I appreciate your taking the time to comment. Obviously, I'm not explaining this project very well. Any suggestions?

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

I think what's throwing

aboutblank's picture

I think what's throwing people off is that here, you are describing what good teachers should just do.

I think the question that we're getting at (or I am at least) is how is a Drupal site going to facilitate this?

As I mentioned above, it makes sense if the "Drupal Dolfin" project includes some kind of scaffolding or semantic cues embedded into the interface to help make it easier for instructors to follow research-based best practices.

But if that's not what it is (which you seem to be expressing above, "The important stuff is NOT in the interfaces"), how is a new Drupal distro going to help me convince an instructor that they should spend their time learning about design and teaching theory?

To extend your metaphor, it sounds like you do not believe that technical frameworks can help writers write a screenplay, but you are simultaneously pitching a technical framework for writing screenplays ("Dolfinity will help authors write dolfins, and give them tools to help").

Forgive me if this is completely wrong, I'm just trying to explain my confusion, here :)

Perhaps this is the key

mathieso's picture

Perhaps this is the key confusion: Dolfinity is not for teachers (mostly).

Dolfinity is for authors (mostly). The people who write textbooks. They stop writing textbooks, and write dolfins instead.

Teachers get the dolfins, and use them. They give feedback to students (or have someone else do it). They get reports on student performance. They customize dolfins. But they don't create them.

Dolfinity is not just a Drupal distro. There are three parts to it.

First, a guide to writing dolfins. It explains the research principles, and shows how they can be implemented in a dolfin.

The guide isn't a fill-in-the-blank workbook. That isn't possible. Just as there isn't a fill-in-the-blank workbook for creating good PHP OOP libraries. There are principles (e.g., abstraction) and tools (e.g., the trait statement). It takes work to learn how to use the tools to implement the principles.

The guide is a constant work-in-progress, as learning research continues. There will be many contributors - I hope!

Second, there's a community (I hope!). It will help people with dolfin-making issues, but also with marketing, sales, and other gritty real world stuff.

Third, there is the Drupal distro. It will have features that help implement principles, but they'll only be valuable if you know how to use them.

For example, take the WYSIWYG editor button that lets you quickly add a character to a lesson. That's only useful if you know when to use a character, and what to make the character say.

Research on pedagogical agents suggests that characters help with metacognition (among other things).

"What the hell is metacognition?," you ask. Most people don't know. Very few - 1%? - of profs would know. Even so, the data suggests that metacognition is important in successful learning. So, add it to a dolfin, and you'll have a better product.

If you know what metacognition is, and you know that metacognitive awareness can help learning, and you know how to encourage the right kinds of metacognitive awareness at the right times, then you can use the WYSIWYG editor's character feature to make it easier for students to learn skills.

If you don't know these things, you can still understand what the WYSIWYG feature does, but you won't know why, when, where, or how to use it to help students learn. You won't know what to make the character say, and the WYSWIWG tool can't do that for you. No more than Photoshop can give a good sense of color.

Some other random things.

  • Teachers can write dolfins, but then they become authors, for the purposes of the project.
  • Dolfinity is for higher ed, the way I think of it, though K12 people may appreciate it more. They tend to know more about learning.
  • There is a business model that encourages authors to write dolfins.

Man, I really SUCK at explaining this project. Thnx for sticking with it.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Ok, ok awesome, this pretty

aboutblank's picture

"Dolfinity is not for teachers (mostly). Dolfinity is for authors (mostly). The people who write textbooks. They stop writing textbooks, and write dolfins instead."

Ok, ok awesome, this pretty much clarifies it for me.

So do you envision a Drupal distro to build and distribute Dolfins? Either as a hosted option or for authors to download and host their own?

I could envision this working as an LTI tool provider, too.

edit - Ah, you totally described that above, duh.

Aye

mathieso's picture

Yes, a Drupal distro for people to download, with a hosted version for those who don't want to do it themselves.

I didn't know about LTI until recently. It's exciting. It would be way cool to have a dolfin running inside, say, Moodle, and passing exercise feedback results back to Moodle. btopro's vision of unbundling the LMS makes Much Sense.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

context as to "btopro's

btopro's picture

context as to "btopro's vision" since I know we've talked at great length in the past about edtech -- http://btopro.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/getting-out-of-the-lms/
or
http://twitpic.com/bzsqbe which I will describe this weekend..

Revenue sharing model?

emdalton's picture

So what you are proposing is a system to create and serve content like that provided by Carnegie Mellon's Open Learning Initiative: https://oli.cmu.edu/

Suppose I, as an author and instructional designer, want to create interactive learning objects in Dolfinity and make them available to others via LTI. Is Dolfinity going to handle brokering these objects? Or do I need to set up a payment and fulfillment system?

With the model you are proposing, I think it's going to be a struggle to get higher ed institutions involved unless faculty can just designate a collection of "dolfins" as the textbook for their courses, and require students to purchase access or whatever. Among other things, that means there will need to be a facility for faculty to review content and see student feedback, learning effectiveness data, etc.

(I don't know as I have any particular interest in developing content for this model, honestly, as I'm focusing more on developing rich simulations, rather than static content objects.)

Kinda

mathieso's picture

So what you are proposing is a system to create and serve content like that provided by Carnegie Mellon's Open Learning Initiative: https://oli.cmu.edu/

Not really. Two differences:

  • OLI (last time I looked) was about tools and infrastructure. It wasn't about good learning. That is, authors aren't given a course building method that's based on learning science principles. For Dolfinity, the Drupal distro is only 1/3 of the project. There's also (1) a guide to course building that improves as learning research advances, and (2) a community of dolfineers.

  • Dolfins are not open. Authors can charge for them. IMHO, that is essential for creating sustainable, high quality dolfins. Note that because authors get all the revenue, they can afford to charge low prices, and still make a decent living.

(Aside: when all content is free, the only people who can afford to create content are those whose efforts are subsidized somehow. That's not a stable situation.)

Suppose I, as an author and instructional designer, want to create interactive learning objects in Dolfinity and make them available to others via LTI. Is Dolfinity going to handle brokering these objects? Or do I need to set up a payment and fulfillment system?

My vision is that Dolfinity would support LTI out of the box. That solves many problems.

Not sure exactly how the charging system would work, but Dolfinity would have a basic mechanism in place. The trick is to link an institutional OAuth account to a license. That should be in Dolfinity, but I'm not sure how.

In any case, I'm imagining Commerce would be part of the distro, with instructions on how to set up a couple of payment gateways.

With the model you are proposing, I think it's going to be a struggle to get higher ed institutions involved unless faculty can just designate a collection of "dolfins" as the textbook for their courses, and require students to purchase access or whatever. Among other things, that means there will need to be a facility for faculty to review content and see student feedback, learning effectiveness data, etc.

Agree with all of that. Independent profs are the key, those who can adopt a "textbook" without committee approval. Fortunately, there are many such humans, at least in universities.

Community colleges often have centralized adoption decisions. However, with the flipped nature of dolfins, and their ability to offer quality, branded courses in remote locations, there will be good reasons for admins to consider dolfins.

Content review features should - maybe not in the first version, but eventually - allow faculty to:

  • Annotate dolfins and share their annotations with students. Include links to their own material.
  • Mark sections and exercises as required.
  • Add their own favorite exercises, that would be merged into the standard exercise system.

If by "feedback" you mean "students' opinions about Dolfinity," I can tell you that some will be negative. Dolfins, ideally, have lots of exercises. My experience in teaching with dolfins over the past few years (http://coredogs.com was the first dolfin - you can try it) is that students are surprised by the amount of work. IMHO, it's a Good Thing that dolfins keep students on task, but some students aren't used to working.

Of course, this is a problem for schools that only use student opinion surveys to evaluate faculty teaching. Nothing we can do about that.

(I don't know as I have any particular interest in developing content for this model, honestly, as I'm focusing more on developing rich simulations, rather than static content objects.)

Here's something to think about: are students getting the most out of your simulations? Some instructors will use them as busy work. "Here, do this set of steps, and take a quiz." Students don't learn about the simulated processes.

Suppose you wrote a short dolfin, that helped students learn about the simulated processes. Guided them through the Big Ideas. Helped them explore pedagogically important scenarios. Would that be worthwhile?

May I ask what simulations you write?

I've always enjoyed writing simulations. I'm one of the dudes behind Visual Statistics, a stats learning package in the '90s. We did a lot with simulation. For example, students set up a group comparison scenario, then ran ANOVA simulations, and got the distribution of the test statistic. Fun stuff. Also simulators for basic probability, regression, quality control, other stuff.

Actually, we wrote a workbook for Visual Statistics. Exercises to help them learn about stats. Otherwise, they would press the buttons, and "Ooooo" at the pretty pictures. :-)

Thnx for the comment. It helps.

Regards,
Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

mechanism to support peer grading

sandra@digitalworldbiology.com's picture

Hi,

I'm not sure where to put this comment, but I have been teaching on-line for five years (and in person for over 20). For the past three years, I've been using a Drupal site for my class that I built.

I think dolfins sound really interesting and I would like to request a feature.

If you could add something to support peer grading it would be really helpful. Peer grading, as you probably know, is well supported by the research for helping students develop metacognitive skills. I decided to add some peer-graded activities to my class this semester, and I'm just not sure how to go about assigning the work to grade and collecting and tallying all the scores. It would be great if there were a module or feature that could support this.

Aye, I do know about peer

mathieso's picture

Aye, I do know about peer feedback research. Not an expert, though. Mazur's research on that is quite interesting.

Do you know about Francom et al. (2009) in TechTrends? Part of that paper was peer interaction in Bio 100. Just got the paper, haven't read it yet. Merrill is a coauthor, so it should be interesting. If you want the paper, email me at kieran@dolfinity.com - I'd upload it here, but am not sure that's kosher.

Sorry, rambling. Anyway, the first dolfin was CoreDogs at http://coredogs.com. It's been in use for a few years. It had peer evaluation built-in from the beginning, to some extent at least. There's a little about that at http://dolfinity.com/coredogs-internals.

However, it's only a start. I would LOVE to make peer interaction a focus in Dolfinity. The research is too strong to ignore it. Not sure the best way to implement it. We'd have to work that out.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

I believe that templates are

mradcliffe's picture

I believe that templates are incredibly important for an authoring tool, which is why I was so excited about textbook. Creating WYSIWYG templates provides a tool for authors to use to improve upon the readability and structure of their text.

It provides an author the ability to create "course goals, creating exercises with good rubrics, writing content showing problem-solving processes" that are distinct, easily accessible, and customizable.

However authoring is just one part of writing a "dolfin". The collection of metadata surrounding skills, assessment banks, etc... is just as important so an author can create "course goals, ... excercises with good rubrics" or dolfins.

Aye!

mathieso's picture

Thnx for the comment. It helps.

However authoring is just one part of writing a "dolfin". The collection of metadata surrounding skills, assessment banks, etc... is just as important so an author can create "course goals, ... excercises with good rubrics" or dolfins.

If "assessment banks" means databases of multiple choice questions, there are none.

Why? Because multiple choice questions can't assess skills. For example, you can't assess someone's ability to write a Drupal module by giving them a multiple choice quiz. The ONLY way to do it is to have them write a module, and have a human evaluate their work against a rubric. Note: there is NO other way. None. Nada. Negatory.

And of course, a multiple choice quiz is not very useful as formative feedback. Formative feedback doesn't just tell you whether you wrote a good module. It tells you why it is good or not, and how to improve.

"HERESY! Torches! Pitchforks! Multiple choice quizzes are the basis of standardized testing! They're even used in Microsoft certification tests!"

I'm tough minded about this. Show me the evidence that multiple choice quizzes can assess skills, or give good formative feedback. Not in a special case, like an NCAT math course that uses highly restricted content and some expert system rules. In the general world, for many skills, like programming, writing, drawing, Web design, data analysis, etc.

Is there anyone who really thinks that the skill "build a simple Drupal site from a basic spec" can be tested by a multiple choice quiz? Honestly?

"HERESY! Multiple choice quizzes are easy to grade! Does this sinner think that humans should dirty their hands with such work?"

Yes, I do. If you want to help students use their skill learning time in the best way, there is NO WAY to avoid formative feedback from humans.

"HERESY! Profs already have much to do! Grading takes a lot of time!"

Yes, and yes. But give up on formative feedback from humans, and you give up on helping students learn complex skills, except for the half of the student body who succeed in spite of lackluster instruction.

Maybe there is a better way. How about this? How about we do some systems analysis of grading? Examine the workflow. Do it differently.

This is one of the main contributions of Dolfinity. The feedback workflow is redesigned, to achieve two things:

  • Eliminate every unnecessary mouse click, keystroke, and cognitive operation. Reduce physical and cognitive waste in giving feedback.
  • Standardize outcome evaluation (to the extent possible) using predefined "clickable rubrics." This means that feedback can be outsourced, and done by multiple humans working in parallel.

When you can economically use formative feedback, it changes the way you design courses. Things like assessment banks vanish. You can do things the "right" way - where "right" means "research shows is the most effective."

I'm not sure what "metadata surrounding skills" is. Does it mean defining skill outcomes for a course?

If so, that is part of the process of creating a dolfin. For example, take a course in basic Drupal site building. You want to make a dolfin for that? The first thing is to decide what "basic Drupal site building" means. You ask the community of practice. They don't agree, of course. You can see that in discussions of Drupal certification and other things on this Web site.

Actually, you need to be careful about how you approach the task of defining outcomes. Most members of this community suffer from the expert's blind spot, where they don't know how they do tasks, let alone how they learned it. (I didn't just make this up - there's a big research literature on expertise.)

One problem with this while thing: Dolfinity isn't just thinking outside the box. It burns the box, and makes a better one. That makes it hard to understand. Normal assumptions about things like assessment simply don't apply.

Thnx for taking the time to comment. I appreciate it. What do your colleagues think?

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

I hate multiple choice...

emdalton's picture

... as much or more than anyone here, I'm sure, but I'd need to hear more about how you're planning to support assessment-- whether formative or summative. What kinds of artifacts can students submit as evidence of learning? (Not all learning lends itself to producing text-based files.) Will Dolfinity support self-assessment, peer assessment, assessment in a discourse context? Workshopping? Will Dolfinity accept LTI data from a third party simulation-based assessment?

And if Dolfinity is presenting some kind of prompt for a user response, which the instructor will then manually review and give feedback, will Dolfinity track submissions and status (e.g. what still needs to be reviewed, who needs to be reminded to submit their work), or pass that data to an LMS, or leave it up to the instructor to decide?

To me, the boundary between what you expect Dolfinity to do and what you expect an LMS to do is still blurry. Granted the learner wants and needs individualized feedback on work submitted, but I can do that in Moodle now, and from there I can easily provide the student with college credit, as well, which students also want (because that's what our work culture wants). I build my statistics courses based on a combination of videos from Khan Academy and other sources, tutorials from CMU (progress reported back via LTI), discussions that I initiate, monitor, and encourage, and real-world projects largely designed by my students, in which they submit an annotated spreadsheet that answers a question they are prompted to ask for themselves. Currently I do all this in Moodle. I could envision doing it in a more open social website, e.g. based on Drupal. What would I use from Dolfinity in this scenario?

Good questions. What kinds of

mathieso's picture

Good questions.

What kinds of artifacts can students submit as evidence of learning?

Students complete exercises. Exercises are embedded in the content. There are screen shots at:

http://dolfinity.com/coredogs-internals

http://coredogs.com/article/feedback-system

Exercises are active. For my Web courses at CoreDogs, students make pages or parts of pages, and upload them to a server. Then they submit URLs. My most recent class submitted 97 solutions per student.

For CoreDogs, text was sufficient. But...

  • For a database design course, students would submit diagrams as well as text. The SVG module is way cool, or they attach files from, e.g., Visio.
  • For a math course, where students must show their work, could be (1) using a drawing tablet (Bamboo, for example), and submitting the resulting graphic, or (2) taking a photo of handwritten work with a cell phone, and texting it in.
  • For stats, it would depend on the tools instructors have students use. Say they use Excel. WYSIWYG editor, plus file attachment. Maybe they use R. Editor and file attachments. Using Google spreadsheets? Text, with URLs.

Will Dolfinity support self-assessment, peer assessment, assessment in a discourse context?

Peer assessment: that's part of CoreDogs already, to an extent. That would need to be improved, with input from people like yourself.

Self-assessment: depends what you mean. I'm thinking that there would be a quiz feature that students could use for self-diagnosis of understanding. Is that what you mean?

Discourse: already been speaking to people about teaching writing with Dolfinity. It's a good fit. I don't see why conversations couldn't be assessed, if you can make a rubric.

And if Dolfinity is presenting some kind of prompt for a user response, which the instructor will then manually review and give feedback, will Dolfinity track submissions and status (e.g. what still needs to be reviewed, who needs to be reminded to submit their work)

Aye to all. One proviso: the instructor may not be the one giving feedback. Could be a TA, or even a grader in another country.

pass that data to an LMS, or leave it up to the instructor to decide?

Pass the data to an LMS, is what I am thinking.

discussions that I initiate, monitor, and encourage, and real-world projects largely designed by my students, in which they submit an annotated spreadsheet that answers a question they are prompted to ask for themselves.

You seem more pedagogically advanced than most statistics instructors. Kudos!

I've been imagining dolfins replacing the textbooks and lectures of more traditional, textbook-bound statistics courses. However, your approach would be more effective in helping students learn proactive problem solving (I'm guessing). It'd be great to add to Dolfinity features that would let people create dolfins for courses like yours, to spread that approach.

I'm hoping that people like yourself will help determine how Dolfinity is constructed.

Currently I do all this in Moodle.

There is nothing you couldn't do in Moodle that you could do in Dolfinity. It's a question of effectiveness, efficiency, and revenue.

  • Moodle does not help you use learning science research findings to design content and course. Dolfinity will. The Drupal distro is only 1/3 of the Dolfinity project. There's also (1) a guide to designing dolfins, and (2) a community to help. Authors' creations would implement Deep learning, Oucome-based Learning, formative Feedback, Interaction with experts, and Nudging students - DOLFIN.
  • The Dolfinity feedback system is specifically designed to let graders give formative feedback quickly, and in a standardized way. You can do the same with Moodle, but it isn't optimized for that.
  • There's a business model that is an important part of the Dolfinity project. Dolfinity will have Commerce built-in, so authors can charge for their work. You can do that with Moodle, but it's not a main thrust of the product. The business model is discussed at http://dolfinity.com/new-business-model.

What would I use from Dolfinity in this scenario?

You could be an author. You could package your content and methods in a dolfin, and let other instructors use it. You could give it away, or charge for it. You would get all of the revenue. That means you could afford to charge low prices, and still have a good income.

Instructors use your dolfin instead of a textbook. They get good pedagogy without having to invent it themselves. They could annotate your dolfin, and share the annotations with their students. They could stop lecturing, and become problem solvers. More fun for them, and better for students.

Thanks for your comments. Useful. I hope you'd consider being part of the project.

Regards,
Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Sorry you seem to have jumped

mradcliffe's picture

Sorry you seem to have jumped on one of my examples there and started to rant... I don't think you got the point I was trying to make at all.

I am not an educator. I am a developer. But I keep an open eye and ear at the place I consult at in order to learn more about pedagogy (K-12).

What I have learned is that you don't just author a text book. There is a ton of research into learning and providing tools for educators and students. These can be in the form of assessments, rubrics, activities, prompts, etc... These methods are based on the end goal of obtaining skills set through standards and research such as Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Metadata is collections of properties associated with things. CCSS is one of those. Maybe a textbook publisher has their own properties that go into developing rubrics. These are complex and don't fit into a standard web publishing/authoring model. Instead an author writes text that are associated with metadata such as skills and that can be applied through various methods.

The end result is a textbook, but getting there is not just putting pen to paper or typing words.

Sorry for the rant

mathieso's picture

I can rant, that's so. But it's considered ranting, not random.

There is a ton of research into learning and providing tools for educators and students.

This is true. I've read a ton of it myself. Dolfinity is based on it. Well, a subset, anyway.

These methods are based on the end goal of obtaining skills set through standards and research such as Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

IMHO, this is not true.

Common Core claims to be research based. If that's true, they've been very selective in choosing research. I won't rant about it, though I did a while back (can't find that article just now). My conclusion: CC hurts skill learning.

To your main point: publishers have processes for authors. There are standards, reviews, and other stuff.

I know, I've been through those processes, as an author, and as a reviewer. The problem is, they're broken processes.

None of the people involved in making a typical college textbook know much about learning. The authors - usually profs - are experts in their field, but have not studied learning. The research you mentioned? They don't know it.

The reviewers are other profs, with the same limits. The technical editors don't know about learning. The copy editors don't. The media people don't. The project editor doesn't.

This doesn't affect sales, at least not much. Why? The publishers are selling to profs who don't know much about learning either.

There is only one publisher I've worked with that uses learning research: O'Reilly, for their Head First series. You can read about their approach at http://shop.oreilly.com/category/series/head-first/formula.do .

I want to replace the normal textbook building process with one that works. "Works" means that it creates textbook-like-things that help students learn skills effectively and efficiently. A process based on learning research.

Keep in mind, Dolfinity is not just about a Drupal distro. That's only 1/3 of the project. There's also (1) a guide to content and course design, updated as learning research advances, and (2) a community to help authors create effective content.

I've not written a K12 textbook. But, as a parent, I've been on the receiving end. My daughter's 11th grade math text was, er, flawed, to say the least. Flawed compared to the way math is taught in Japan or Singapore. BTW, Google "Singapore math" for products that are used in a few US schools.

Regards,
Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Thanks for the textbook plug.

btopro's picture

Thanks for the textbook plug. We'll be adding more well structured examples based on a course we are creating in March using all the distributions that implement textbook currently. These will be used to repopulate and improve the textbook_templates feature that comes bundled with textbook :)

If you have other instructional page templates I'd be very happy to share these with our instructional designers and bake them into the core textbook package

I agree templates are not

btopro's picture

I agree templates are not enough. We're working on two different layers to it. There's the on page, nitty-gritty template. This would be something like well defined learning objectives or media that's sandwiched with setup language and conclusion remarks in a visually appealing way.

The second part of templating is entire instructional models. One would be modular based design as opposed to time-driven design. Time driven would be a series of weeks (1-15) with sample templates underneath them. Modular would be 5 Units each with specifically implemented page templates to create a well-formed instructional flow. The material on the templates will be instructions that an instructional designer (someone formally trained in training generation) would give.

Not refuting anything you are saying, just clarifying the templates in templates approach for capturing instructional design expertise and helping transfer it to instructors.

Re the confusion

tewnet's picture

Is seems to me that dolfinity is less like a Drupal initiative and more like a learning initiative that uses Drupal. The initial description of the distro had me thinking that this was primarily a unique and new use of Drupal for learning. But as I've heard more, it seems like a unique learning initiative that uses some of Drupal's out-of-the box capabilities. Although people have also been talking about how to leverage Drupal to even greater effect.

Does that make sense to anyone else?

Aye, that's so.

mathieso's picture

You got it.

I'll admit it: I suck at explaining this.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

It's a hard concept to explain.

bonobo's picture

It's a hard concept to explain, in part because you are attempting to explain a process more than a specific thing.

Concrete examples of what can be achieved with the process can help; I would recommend examples that can be used to demonstrate the range of what can be supported by the process.

Possibly, starting with a completed dolfin and then reverse engineering both the steps required to create it and the rationale behind those steps would be helpful.

I would also look at this thread as a form of UX testing that could help inform creating personas of people that will benefit from using the system

Good point

mathieso's picture

You're right, the process is actually the central thing. There are tools to support the process, but the tools are useless by themselves.

As to a completed dolfin. CoreDogs is a dolfin I've been using for a few years. There are actually two dolfins at http://coredogs.com, but I haven't taught with the second one for some time.

There is no need to reverse engineer, since I created CoreDogs. There's a brief discussion of the internals at http://dolfinity.com/coredogs-internals . I've also attempted to make a Dolfinity thing, but got stuck. I'll write more about that sometime.

The personas idea is quite interesting. I've been thinking fairly narrowly about use cases, and that's a problem. I need to think more broadly. Thnx for that idea.

Regards,
Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Clarity?

joel_osc's picture

I think what the folks from the Drupal community would be interested in is how the base Drupal functionality has been extended for the purpose of learning? For example, if I look under the hood is a dolfin a standard content type, an entity, other? And what other modules are used to extend functionality: Quiz, Gradebook, Course? Or is a Dolfin just a Basic Page with a WYSIWYG editor with a few custom buttons on node body. If this is the case then the value add for this distro is really the knowledge that you provide in and around creating learning content and not in the extension of Drupal.

I would be really interested if a Dolfin was an entity, with the images and different components which comprise a Dolfin available as fields and ctools plugins. This along with the vast knowledge you have provided would be a great platform from which to build. I would use it for sure to develop content for my courses - which I also teach btw, unfortunately some Profs still do both.

The Drupal side of CoreDogs, the first dolfin

mathieso's picture

I followed joel_osc's advice. I wrote an article about the internals of CoreDogs, the first dolfin. I created it in D6, from 2008-2010.

The article is at http://dolfinity.com/coredogs-internals. It basically covers the "f" of "dolfin." There's more to Dolfinity (and CoreDogs) than what is in that article.

Later, I'll write about other things I've tried.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Video on Dolfinity motivations

mathieso's picture

Making more videos about the project. The first one is why I care so much. It's at:

http://dolfinity.com/discussion/video-why-i-care

1 minute and 41 secs long. Short is good.

Kieran


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com

Video on how to start helping people learn skills

mathieso's picture

http://youtu.be/ndvt4uuYQB0

Featuring: Explanation man.

1 minute 34 seconds


Kieran Mathieson
kieran@dolfinity.com